So, as all of you Liability Magazine readers know, my subject is “TV, Film and Documentaries”. I absolutely LOVE watching and learning, however my blogs often merge a few subjects together. Let’s say this piece is about a documentary, “Jeremy Scott – The People’s Designer” (Now available on Netflix). I think this blog is also about fashion, something which, I know just enough about to be able to have my own personal style, but I don’t really take much notice of current “trends” as such. Although, nothing makes me happier than seeing people express themselves through clothes, hair, and just their general outlook and the vibe that they put out there to the world!

 

This article should also be a source of inspiration… not from me! The most inspirational thing I do is get myself out of bed and try and muddle through life, dodging countless curve balls, and slowly scratching my way to the proverbial “top”… Jeremy Scott on the other hand, has a fighting spirit, an admirable one, a spirit and determination that you wish you could bottle, and drink it all before anyone else gets the chance.

 

I LOVE documentaries, about anything, fashion, murders, gardening, sharks; whatever it is, if it’s made well – I’m sold. There was an interesting beginning to Jeremy’s story in that, a teacher of his actually told him to become an designer and told him that he could succeed. This is rare and powerful. In my experience, the school system has often misguided and misdirected people with “talent” and tried to get them to follow a more conventional educational journey. So I was pleased to see that Jeremy got encouraged to pursue his talent and I was excited to see where the story would go from there.

 

On assembling a portfolio of his first original Jeremy Scott designs, and sending them to FIT in New York, he received his first rejection letter. The letter read “we cannot accept you, as you lack originality, artistic ability and creativity.” What a soul destroying letter to receive! I feel as humans we regularly get criticised, talked down to, and generally doubted by others, and it’s how we deal with that criticism that defines us!

 

On receipt of this letter Jeremy didn’t give up, but instead he believed in his vision SO much that he relocated to Paris, made his own collection and hosted his own runway shows. To me, this is so inspiring, as even as the most confident person with a huge amount of self-belief can be temporarily destroyed by the remarks of people in positions of power.

 

To again, make this article about myself (no surprise there) there are times, especially at the moment that I’m told NO. I’m trying to break into a new industry, as a relatively young girl, with little experience and people telling me NO daily. But not only do they tell you NO, they also tell you everything that is wrong with you, “you’re too vague”, “you’re too specific”, “you’re too confident”, “you’re not confident enough”. Until you are literally lying awake on a mixture of caffeine, half a bottle of Sauvignon, and an undeniable sickness from a chocolate bar that you definitely shouldn’t have eaten… thinking, “what am I?”, “who am I?”, “what is my purpose?”. The self-doubt creeps in. The world creates all these solutions, the people that doubt themselves just SLIGHTLY less than everyone else writes books about how not to doubt yourself and you read them, feeling like a failure for not being able to adapt to their “Blue Sky Thinking technique”, their bloody “Rainbow and Butterflies” technique, their special way of breathing in the positive and exhaling the negative. The elimination of jealousy, of paranoia, of carbs, of gluten. Do you know what I’ve realised? It’s ALL bullshit.

 

Take inspiration from being told no, but don’t try and better yourself for them, don’t try and make yourself perfect for them, the industry, the world! Be you and if someone wants you, great! But if they don’t – want yourself! Put your face out there so much that you haunt them with your fabulousness. Scream YOU from the rooftops and don’t apologise for who you are.

 

This is what Jeremy has done, he’s ignored criticism, worked hard, and even when it came to his business partnership with Moschino he said if they didn’t like his “audition” collection then it obviously wasn’t meant to be. I think we all need a bit of that in our lives. I am a true believer in destiny, karma, and that our paths are laid out, and I truly believe that if we follow our morals, instinct and stay true to ourselves that we will all be successful and live full lives. I also know, as Jeremy Scott did, that I am destined for great things and I think we should all have that internal ego, and sickening cockiness, because if we don’t 100% believe in ourselves. Who will?

 

So for my actual review of the documentary, (of course I am going to use my trusty “hat” rating), I give it 5/5 hats! After this documentary, I was left inspired, angry, and ready to take on the world. What more could you ask for? I suggest watching this documentary if you’ve got a job interview to go and smash, or even if you just want some AMAZING style inspo for going to the supermarket! This documentary was thoroughly enjoyable, and captivating. It also kept me awake after a long week at work, which believe me is pretty difficult. Watch this documentary, it’s on Netflix now. You won’t regret it.

 

Kel

 

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My favourite quotes from the documentary.

 

“There is no one better to do this, than me!”

 

“Jeremy is an outsider in mainstream fashion”

 

“It’s about the way that they carry it, do they convey the story that I’m trying to tell? Do they look like an artist from the lower Eastside in the late 80’s or is it this glamorous woman going to see an opera in the Scala, wearing an evening dress that just happens to be printed like a potato chip bag”

 

“I don’t deal well with censorship or being told what to do, it’s just not part of my character”.

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